You know the old saying – ‘you are what you eat’ may be true. Well it certainly  may be that we are (at least in size that is) based upon how much we eat. There was a recent article by Herman Pontzer published in the NY Times. Pontzer is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Hunter College in NYC. Pontzer and colleagues did a study of energy expenditure of a native tribe in Africa. They compared their energy expenditure vs other humans energy expenditure and came up with some interesting information:

Our findings add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that energy expenditure is consistent across a broad range of lifestyles and cultures. Of course, if we push our bodies hard enough, we can increase our energy expenditure, at least in the short term. But our bodies are complex, dynamic machines, shaped over millions of years of evolution in environments where resources were usually limited; our bodies adapt to our daily routines and find ways to keep overall energy expenditure in check.

All of this means that if we want to end obesity, we need to focus on our diet and reduce the number of calories we eat, particularly the sugars our primate brains have evolved to love. We’re getting fat because we eat too much, not because we’re sedentary. Physical activity is very important for maintaining physical and mental health, but we aren’t going to Jazzercise our way out of the obesity epidemic.’

You can read the full article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/26/opinion/sunday/debunking-the-hunter-gatherer-workout.html?_r=0

I found this article quite interesting and thought provoking. I also came across an interesting eating strategy or program based upon less is more called ’80 Bites’. This program basically works by teaching the participant to be aware of ‘How Much They Eat’ and 80 bites per day should be our maximum according to Meredith Luce, MS, RD, LD/N. This Ms. Luce determined based upon FDA approved portion size – and therefore 80 bites is the limit. The thought here is that our stomachs are overstretched and if we decided to follow a diet that recommends lower calorie foods so that you can ‘eat as much as you would like’ continue to play into the fact that we keep our stomachs stretched and our stomachs continue to want to be fed. Therefore when your stomach is no longer stretched you will no longer be hungry…interesting. If you need more information you can check it out for yourself. http://www.80bites.com

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